Copper pots in a castle.

So before we get to more dessert recipes as promised, I wanted to show you some more cooking inspiration from our trip to Munich for Oktoberfest and our dear friend Nate’s 30th birthday. It’s something that I just adore… I can’t get enough of them even though I don’t actually own a single one… copper pots!

The castle literally had around 150 copper beauties. It was insane!

So copper is supposed to be the best material for pots because it is a great heat conductor, but that is true because it is also one of the softest metals, which means it is also a lot of work to maintain! A perfect shine requires that you polish it after every use. Just touching the pan (the oils in your hand) will leave dark stains. A lot of pros appreciate a nice patina on their copper and I do think the dark color can be quite beautiful. You can find a guide to how to polish copper here.

Although, I think it could be like polishing silver… something relaxing and therapeutic. I get a lot of immediate gratification from a freshly pressed stack of linen napkins! Sometimes everyday maintenance tasks can give you a very satisfying feeling of productivity. Or else, they just accumulate on your to do list.

Back to fantasy land for the minute… So, to be honest, in my dream, dream kitchen… i.e. the one that there is no way will ever come to be unless I come back as Cinderella, I think I would have a giant copper pot rack with lots of copper pots hanging on it. Then, I would have regular, everyday pans stored in the cupboards below.

Isn’t this a lovely dish washing area? You could heat up the copper bins and have one with soapy water and one with clean for rinsing. Very efficient! Would make feeding the multitudes even without electricity a piece of cake! I love the fish poachers above… yes, I’ll admit it. I have a secret love of totally absurd cookware. I realize that you don’t need a pan, a large pan at that, just for poaching fish, but yet I want one. This is the real, live princess within. But, seriously isn’t this beautiful?

(It sold for $459 on EBay.)

Moving on to more absurdly large kitchen luxuries…

So yes, I do. I do want my own rotisserie in my kitchen–how amazing would that would be!? I can taste that succulent chicken already. It’s up there on my list along with a wood fired oven.

The one piece of copper I do own is a bowl for whipping egg whites–copper supposedly makes egg whites more stable.

I actually put the bowl into storage because let’s be honest… I think copper does probably make some small difference, but you really buy (and hopefully use) it to enjoy the pomp and circumstance.

When we do move home and I am reunited with my bowl, I will purchase one of these as I think it would make the bowl infinitely more practical. In fact, I don’t know why it doesn’t come with the bowl automatically.

So the pots were amazing, but the castle was okay, too.

Neuschwanstein castle was what Walt Disney modeled Sleeping Beauty’s castle after.

To bring things full circle, a picture of the Sleeping Beauty Castle at the Hong Kong Disneyland.

Picture by David. Q. — we haven’t been, yet! Need some little peoples to come visit. us.

And some more pictures from Germany… check out that contrail.

Ahhhh… and the breathtaking countryside.

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7 Responses to Copper pots in a castle.

  1. Those old-fashioned kitchens are just amazing. I almost admire the shelves more than the pots…
    I love your photos!
    Of course, with copper pots, what one needs is not a to-do list, polish, or storage. One needs…servants!

  2. especially valets!

  3. Natasha –
    I love that kitchen and think the post are great! Do egg whites really whip up better in the copper?

    A client who is doing a kitchen remodel absolutely fell in love with the copper pots she saw being made in a town (villedieu-les-poêles) in Normandy that is famous for it’s copper works. So when she started re-doing her kitchen she looked them up and found out that they weren’t as expensive as you’d think.
    If you are ever interested:
    http://thecopperworkshop.com/22/cooking
    Here are the dtls on the set she ordered and had mailed to the US.
    The set of pans are 5: diam 12cm, 14cm, 16cm, 18cm and 20cm and is priced at 490€ but you do not pay tax here so we subtract 19.6% (96.04€) so the price to you is 393.96€. The cost of shipping is 165€ so the total cost to you is 558.96€.

  4. So fascinating. I love old kitchens and am curious about old methods.

    I think I read in Julia Child that the copper has an acid that helps the egg whites whip better, but you can mimic the effect with a pinch of cream of tartar. That’s what I do, because I don’t own any copper. But I do own lots of cast iron which must be seasoned after (almost) every use – not an onerous job at all for me.

    And Germany. . . .. oh, I LOVE Germany (I am Swiss-German). And those castles are so enchanting.

    • Excellent video my brother! My quseoitn is this, In the past I have heard both you and Joe mention mixing in mono. Now I know this is for a static mix, however what do you do with the faders after you get your static mix? Thank you and God Bless!-Tal

  5. Love this post. I have always felt like I really NEEDED at least one piece of copper cookware because you’re just supposed to have copper, right? But the truth is that I am in love with le creuset enameled cast iron and use it for just about everything except boiling water. I can’t imagine any other pan distributing heat more evenly and the clean-up seems almost magical.

    Margo, I have a secret for cleaning cast iron: Drain your pan of oil and wipe with a paper towel (a very thin coat of oil left is actually good). Then pour in a liberal amount of kosher salt and scrub the pan with another paper towel using the salt as an exfoliant to pick up any dried bits. Sometimes I will rub a bit of vegetable oil in the pan afterwards and cover it with tin foil for storing. There are times when you absolutely can’t help but use dish soap on cast iron, but the amount used should be minimal and it is best to avoid soap altogether. Cast iron is probably not for the germaphobe but I come from a long line of well seasoned cast iron skillets and have remained quite healthy over many meals cooked in these pans :)

  6. Such great tips from everyone!!!! Thank you. I love the link to the authentic pots Amelia–and it is wonderful that they are reasonably priced. The cream of tartar tip is awesome Margo and I love your cleaning suggestions Sydney. To clean cast iron, sometimes I literally bake off the crud… I put the oven to 500 and then wipe the pan with a generous amount of oil and pop it in the oven for 20 minutes or so. It gives the pot a nice season. Love the pot talk!

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